Living Well In Madison

LIVING WELL IN MADISON

Age Friendly Plan; Moving from Good to GREAT Neighborhoods

 

 

Action Plan Summary

This action plan is one step in a multi-pronged, multi-year effort to increase the livability of Madison for senior residents who wish to age in place in the community. Additional findings from the assessment will be built later into additional steps, along with insights gained from the initial efforts. The “Living Well in Madison” action plan outlines a vision for 6 key domains of livability:

 

1) Housing   Madison currently has an aging housing inventory.  Our vision is to see new senior housing developed over the next three years to allow for options for our residents, and a growing network of resources to help residents stay in their homes with improvements to safety and energy efficiency.

2) Transportation   Madison currently has no large-scale public transportation.  Our vision is to see development of a volunteer network to fill in the gaps of services such as KVCAP and local taxi/ride share programs

3) Community Support & Health Services       Our vision is to see that the availability of support resources, and the awareness of those resources will expand accordingly.  More residents are technically advanced compared to previous generations allowing for faster and more efficient dissemination of information.

4) Outdoor Spaces and Buildings         Madison has an abundance of outdoor recreation opportunities and in the near future development and promotion of trails, paddling and seasonal programs will expand.  Madison’s downtown and municipal infrastructure is very old and pre-dates ADA requirements.  Our vision is to see a long-term capital improvement plan to include renovations to allow for greater access, while working to promote outdoor recreation.

5) Civic Participation Employment       Our vision is to see that civic engagement in Madison becomes intergenerational as younger residents are recruited to join boards and committees.  Economic Development is expected to create between 100 and 150 new jobs in the community over the next 5-10 years, providing employment opportunities for all ages.

6) Social Isolation Social Isolation remains an issue in central Maine with an aging population and cold climate.  In addition to adverse weather, the climate of unfriendliness to outsiders can further isolate residents of all ages.  Our vision is to see Madison re-invent itself and its approach to reaching out across generational and geographical boundaries.

The People Engaged in “Living Well in Madison”

 

In May of 2020, Cheyenne Stevens was hired by the Town to serve as the Living Well Coordinator. Funded in part by a grant from the Maine Community Foundation, Cheyenne’s work focuses on implementation of the many goals and objectives outlined in this plan.  Cheyenne can be reached at

The assessment and planning work that has generated this action plan was directed and coordinated by an 11-member steering committee whose members are the following:

Town of Madison Age-Friendly Steering Committee Members (2018-2021)

Name

Representing

Committee(s)

Barbara Cary

Retiree, Home Visitor Volunteer, Citizen

Planning

Deb Casey

Somerset Public Health Aging in Place Program Coordinator

Assessment and Planning

Cheryl Curtis

S.N.A.P. Educator, Citizen

Planning

Tim Curtis

Town Manager/Economic Development Director, Citizen

Assessment and Planning

Danielle Denis

Somerset Public Health substance use prevention specialist

Planning

Sally Dwyer

Retired bank manager, Citizen

Planning

Julie Forbus

Town Librarian, Citizen

Assessment and Planning

Mavis Gallager

Retiree, Volunteer, Citizen

Assessment

John Harlow

Local Cable Program Producer (SCTV11)

Planning

Kristie LeBlanc

Somerset Public Health Assistant Project Director, Former school board member, citizen

Planning

Maddy Theriault

Town Office Intern, Citizen

Planning

Community Demographic Snapshot

The main source of demographic data for Madison and Somerset County as a whole is the American Community Survey (ACS), released annually by the Bureau of the Census.

ACS estimates for small communities like Madison are somewhat limited, since sample sizes are too small to yield reliable estimates for many variable combinations. The 2013-2017 Survey estimated that there were 4,726 persons living in the town.  42% of the population is over the age of 55:

Age Range

Population

Percent of Total Population

55 to 59 years

443

9.4%

60 to 64 years

497

10.5%

65 to 74 years

594

12.6%

75 to 84 years

298

6.3%

85 years and older

154

3.3%

Nearly all (95%+) were white. Females hold a slight majority of residents over 65 (56% to 44%).  Of residents aged 60+, 9.4% had lived in poverty in the last 12 months; that percentage rose to 14.2% for persons aged 65+.

Of residents aged 65-74, 31.3% had some form of disability, and 56.2% of those aged 75+ fell in this category.

Of the 1,046 persons over age 64 in Madison, 

               

65% of men were married, 12.0% were widowed, 22.5% were divorced and 0.4% had never married.

36% of women were married, 30% were widowed, 26.5% were divorced, and 7.5% had never married.

               

81.9% were high school graduates or higher, and 16.7% had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

               

38.9% of those aged 65-74 were military veterans, and 17.5% of those aged 75+.

               

Only 5 persons spoke a language other than English at home.

The labor force participation rate for those aged 60-64 was 64.2%; it was 15.0% for those aged 65-74, and 0% for those over 74.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to the Plan

 

The Living Well in Madison Approach:

 

The work began by reviewing Madison seniors’ needs and preferences based on our assessment survey results and a general discussion of the data with our evaluator. The assessment and planning committee also reviewed previous research by the Tri-State Aging Collaborative and action plans developed previously by some other AARP Age-Friendly communities in Maine to identify actions which have been found effective in helping seniors thrive in their communities.

In the next step in the process, the assessment and planning team brought all of this information and their diverse experiences to the table and brainstormed about what actions might be included in Madison’s plan for further improving town elders’ ability to remain in the community as they age.

Discussion focused on six of the AARP/World Health Organization domains of an age-friendly community:  housing, transportation, community support and health services (including communication), outdoor spaces and buildings, civic participation and employment, and respect and social inclusion (including social participation).

For each of these domains, members identified what community successes and positives might be built on further, as well as which immediate and longer-term actions are most important for the community to take. The work plan is a living document to be shared with to community groups for feedback and volunteer recruitment for plan implementation.

 

 Action Plans

 Housing:

Madison currently has an aging housing inventory.  Our vision is to see new senior housing developed over the next three years to allow for options for our residents, and a growing network of resources to help residents stay in their homes with improvements to safety and energy efficiency.

 

  • Assessment: Current Strengths and Areas for Improvement in Housing

Assessment of current strengths

Efficiency Maine energy audits are available; there has been private development of senior housing in recent years; rental property owners keep up their properties; housing information is available on the town website; some senior and low-cost housing exists locally.  

Possible immediate/short-term activities

Expand publicity for Efficiency Maine services; help to mobilize local youth to help older adults with chores helping them to live independently (e.g., shoveling, raking); organize a home repair program; implement sand bucket and smoke alarm projects; add a local representative on the county Senior Strong committee; develop a formal neighbor-helping-neighbor volunteer program; expand provision of information on energy services in ways that effectively reach seniors (e.g., mailbox or word of mouth/face to face).  

Possible long-term activities

Create a program to help fund housing renovation; promote creation of more affordable senior workforce housing, including rental condos and duplex units; promote intergenerational housing options and increase acceptance of co-housing.

  • Research: What did we learn from our community surveys?

 

Survey Respondents said…

“There is very little affordable housing; we need much more for all age groups.  We also need lower property taxes for all types of property.”

“Paying property taxes is not easy.  I don’t use any schools or programs…, and taxes put me in big debt.”

“My home is not warm enough because of… “Drafts and repairs.”  “Need assistance to buy fuel.”  “Frequent loss of power.”

 

 

Selected survey findings:

·         73% of the sample say they own their own home.

·         Less than half reported that they might need to move to another home in their retirement; 21% said they might move to another home in Madison, 27% to a home outside the town.

·         The most common reasons for considering a move to a new home in retirement were to get more available services, facilities (e.g., shopping, library or church) or medical care (63%); preference for a smaller/more accessible home (50%); and need for public or other transportation options (49%).

·         77% reported that their home is warm enough in the winter; of those who say it is not, 67% said paying for fuel is a problem, 61% cited inadequate insulation, and 22% gave other reasons.

·         67% completely agreed that “In retirement, I want to live in my current house as long as possible”; 53% completely agreed that “I want to continue living in Madison as I grow older.”

 

 

Home Modifications Respondents said that they will need to modify their home to age safely and comfortably in the following ways:

 

 

Gain easier access into my home, such as a ramp or sturdy railings

38%

Make bathroom modifications such as grab bars or non-slip tiles

33%

Modify my current home to stay here as long as possible

32%

Get a medical alert system to notify others in case of an emergency

30%

Add more lighting

24%

Make easier access within my home, such as wider doorways

22%

Make a bedroom or bathroom on the first floor

22%

 

 

Available Resources for home repair?

Housing Related Services

Very Important

Already exists

Home repair programs for low-income and older people

71%

10%

Home repair contractors who are trustworthy, reliable, do quality work, and are affordable

63%

13%

Affordable help with seasonal chores (i.e., mow or shovel)

63%

14%

In-home safety checks and evaluations

62%

5%

Respondents were also asked to rate how important each of a list of possible housing-related services are to older people in Madison.  The following table shows that the availability of existing resources is behind the need.

 

  • Goal Setting and Activity Planning

Housing Goal:  To Establish a Home Repair Network

 

Activity 1

Progress

 

Outcome

 

Activity 1.1

 

Create a coordinator position w/job description

 

COMPLETE

In January 2020 the Living Well Coordinator Position was created with a job description.

 

Activity 1.2

 

 

 

Appoint a Living Well Coordinator

 

COMPLETE

In the spring of 2020, a grant from the Maine Community Foundation was obtained for $10.000. In May of 2020, Cheyenne Stevens was hired as the Living Well Coordinator.

 

Activity 2

Progress

 

Outcome

 

Activity 2.1

 

Coordinate network of volunteers

 

ON-GOING

A program has been created between Julie Wallace and the Pathway Students to start assisting older adults in Madison. In the Fall of 2020, 4 residents were assisted with fall raking. There are plans to set up a system to help older adults shovel in the winter.

 

Activity 2.2

 

 

 

Establish funding for a home repair network

 

 

ON-GOING

Funds can be used from the Maine Community Foundation to cover expenses of the home repair network.

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation: 

Madison currently has no large-scale public transportation.  Our vision is to see development of a volunteer network to fill in the gaps of services such as KVCAP and local taxi/ride share programs

 

  • Assessment: Current Strengths and Areas for Improvement in Transportation

Assessment of current strengths

KVCAP’s Somerset Explorer and volunteer driver programs, though the former is limited; willingness of friends/family to help with transportation; Taylor’s Drug makes deliveries; we need expanded easy-to-use transportation options for seniors to do things like errands, grocery shopping, keep medical appointments (including evenings and weekends), or pick-up books from the library. 

Possible immediate/short-term activities

Make it possible for students to provide home delivery as a community service option; facilitate carpooling options; initiate incentives (scholarships?) for young people to work for KVCAP or start affordable taxi service; expand KVCAP’s transportation services (e.g., Somerset Explorer and number of volunteer drivers) and promote them on Channel 11; promote use of Uber services; churches can organize members to help provide transportation; mobilize retired local veterans to serve as drivers.

Possible long-term activities

Investigate towns that have a “paid” transportation system to see how it works; develop grocery delivery systems; use student drivers to take seniors to stores or run errands as part of driver’s education; organize a driver’s brigade; expand/create stipends, local tax credits or gas mileage reimbursements for volunteer drivers; organize a volunteer driver registry/need board; expand bus service to seven days a week.

  • Research: What did we learn from our community surveys?

 

 

Survey Respondents said…

 

“We need more free transportation services.”

“There are volunteer opportunities for people to help those who cannot get to places and shop, perhaps using high school seniors with vehicles.”

“Public transportation is very unreliable for Madison.”

In response to a question asking “How do you get around for things like shopping, visiting the doctor, running errands or going other places?” five respondents volunteered the following comments: “My son is my chauffeur.”  “My in-home workers.”  “Daughters.”  “A friend drives me.”  “A friend for grocery shopping.”

 

 

Selected survey findings:

·         · Most respondents (87%) say that they drive themselves to get around for things like shopping, doctor visits, or running errands; 18% ask others to drive them, and 10% report that they walk.

·         When asked what factors make it hard to get to the places they need to go, half cited the need for money to handle gas or car ownership costs, 31% noted a need for public transportation, 19% reported they need to transport a wheelchair or other equipment, 13% cited darkness, and 9% said they are uncomfortable asking for a ride.

 

 

Transportation Related Services

Very Important

Already exists

Transportation for people with disabilities and older residents

68%

10%

Affordable & reliable public transportation

65%

10%

Transportation to volunteer in the community and to participate in social and recreational opportunities

54%

3%

Domain-Specific Strategy Chart/Action Plan

  • Goal Setting and Activity Planning

Goal: To create new transportation options for residents

 

Activity 1

Progress

Outcome

Activity 1.1

Appoint a Living Well Coordinator.

COMPLETE

Cheyenne Stevens was appointed as the Living Well Coordinator. She works every Wednesday and Thursday as a part-time per diem employee at a rate of $15 per hour.

Activity 1.2

Build a network of intake for driver volunteers.

ON-GOING

So far due to the impact of COVID-19 the progress has of building a network for volunteer drivers has involved researching over towns and their efforts of volunteer transportation networks, especially during COVID-19.

Activity 1.3

Recruit Driver Brigade members and begin service delivery Research neighbors driving neighbors.org.

ON-GOING

 

Activity 1.4

Create Local Tax Credit Program for Driver Brigade Volunteers

ON-GOING

 

Community Support and Health Services Domain

(includes Communication):

 As Madison residents continue to age over the next few years our vision is that the availability of resources, and the awareness of those resources will expand accordingly.  More residents are technically advanced compared to previous generations allowing for faster and more efficient dissemination of information.

 

  • Assessment: Current Strengths and Areas for Improvement in Community Support & Health Services

Assessment of current strengths

Channel 11 and the  electronic sign helps to communicate with residents; bulletin boards in town (e.g., at Reny’s, Madison Public Library, Hannafords) help with communication; evidence-based health programs and free trainings for volunteers are available; Somerset Public Health/Redington-Fairview Hospital does great work in county communities; important services are provided by Healthreach, Senior Companions, Channel 11, the food pantry and Hospice; the library provides helpful information. Channel 11 now provides a Living Well in Madison series of interviews about Madison’s resources.

Possible immediate/short-term activities

Channel 11 has worked to create a series of interviews of resources in Madison that have been broadcasted as well as posted on the Living Well in Madison’s Facebook Page and Channel 11’s Youtube Page.

Possible long-term activities

Expand services at the Madison health center; build career ladders for respite workers, starting with teens; develop a local monthly newsletter, perhaps using high school students to create it as part of a business class; embed chronic disease prevention facilitators in local organizations and businesses; develop a Care Partner Support Group to help caregivers with respite; offer more classes at the health center (e.g., on chronic illnesses, medications/diet, caregiver opportunities).     

 

  • What did we learn from Community Surveys?

Survey Readers said…

“We need more free medical services.”

“Install cable for internet and TV--get cell phone service.”

In response to a question asking “If you were to consider moving out of Madison during retirement, what factors might impact your decision to move?” one respondent volunteered the following comment: “Availability of assisted living facilities.”

 

Selected survey findings

·         32% of respondents report that they have fallen in the past year, and half are concerned about falling.

·         59% say that they engage in some form of physical exercise (such as walking, yoga, biking or strength training) several times a week; 12% report that they rarely or never do this.  

·         37% indicate that a disability or chronic illness keeps them from being as active as they want to be.

·         7% o the sample says that it is a problem for them to pay for their medications; 40% say that it is sometimes a problem, and 53% say it is never a problem.

·         Most (95%) indicate that they get their food at the supermarket; other reported food sources are the farmer’s market (27%), food pantries (27%), their garden (25%), convenience stores (10%), local farms (8%), or meals on wheels (5%). Eight percent volunteered that they sometimes do not have enough food.

·         28% reported that “It is easy for me to get good quality health services in Madison”; 21% completely disagreed with this statement.  

·         75% of the sample reports that they use the Internet several times a week. Seven percent say they never use it, and 7% report they have no Internet access.

·         88% communicate with others via phone, 55% by Facebook, and 52% through email.

·         When asked which resources they would use if they, a family member, or a friend needed information about services for older people, they most often cited the Internet (70%), family or friends (47%), Redington-Fairview General Hospital (42%), Somerset Public Health (28%), Spectrum Generations (23%),  and the phonebook (15%).

 

 

Support & Health Related Services

Very Important

Already exists

Recreation, wellness, and fitness for older folks

69%

3%

Caregiver support services (including respite)

67%

8%

In-home help: meal preparation and light housekeeping

66%

8%

Easy access to quality urgent and routine healthcare

63%

8%

A central place to get community information

62%

12%

Easy to find information about financial help

60%

2%

Access to indoor activity options in winter (example: winter walking)

59%

11%

Hobby groups (such as book or gardening clubs)

57%

0%

Easy to find information about programs and services that will help me age safely and comfortably in my home

56%

5%

Easy to find information about social, recreational, and volunteer opportunities in Madison

54%

5%

Trusted assistance with bill paying, filling-out forms, etc.

53%

3%

Health and wellness classes on topics such as fall prevention, nutrition, and diabetes management

52%

8%

.

Domain-Specific Strategy Chart/Action Plan

 

 

  • Goal Setting and Activity Planning

 

Goal: To develop opportunities for meaningful community connections which are inclusive across socio-economics.

 

 

 

 

Activity 1

Progress

Outcome

 

Activity 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

Secure funding for a communications coordinator

COMPLETE

The Maine Community Foundation grant goes to fund the Living Well Coordinator who participates in looking for more grants for future projects and stays up to date with the age-friendly communities in the area, along with meetings with AARP and related organizations that do age-friendly work.

 

Activity 1-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Create Programming for available health services

ON-GOING

A series of interviews between seven resources in the town of Madison have been completed. These interviews work with the six domains of focus, and the goal is to communicate what is available to Madison Residents and make them aware that they have a source to reach out to If they are in need. There has also been a Facebook Page Created for Living Well in Madison that is run by Cheyenne. The interviews are posted and shared on Facebook as well as broadcasted on Channel 11.

 

Outdoor Spaces and Buildings:

 Madison has an abundance of outdoor recreation opportunities and in the near future development and promotion of trails, paddling and seasonal programs will expand.  Madison’s downtown and municipal infrastructure is very old and pre-dates ADA requirements.  A long-term capital plan will include renovations to allow for greater access.

  • Assessment: Current Strengths and Areas for Improvement in Outdoor Spaces and buildings

Assessment of current strengths

We have a number of outdoor recreation resources/spaces (e.g., Main Street park, playgrounds and ice rinks, hiking trails, downtown walking loop, Preble Avenue recreation area, cross-country ski trail, Lakewood Golf Course, the theater camp); we also have a number of public and privately owned buildings (e.g., Somerset Abbey, Old Point School, Lakewood Theater) that could be used for community activities.        

Possible immediate/short-term activities

Distribute more information to residents about all of the available outdoor recreation resources/spaces; use schools more during the summer and off-season for activities; develop a community garden, possibly asking seniors to volunteer their help; assess access to public spaces and community buildings (e.g., OPA and the library); make sure the OPA community building has needed/updated things that community can use (e.g., a sink, white folding tables).  

Possible long-term activities

Develop/expand river walk, bike/walking/running trails and snowshoe/cross-country ski trails; increase accessibility (walkability and bicycle-ability) downtown for people of different abilities (e.g., provide benches, bikes, bike racks); have a senior center area for adult education activities; create a needs assessment tool to gather information about needs for public access improvements such as sidewalks, curbs, and entrances to public places.

 

  • What did we learn from community surveys?

 

Survey Respondents said…

“Places like the library need to be easier for disabled people to get into; they need to be handicapped accessible for wheel chairs and walkers.”

“I love the library, but am unable to use it because of all the stairs

 inside the building.”

“Recreational fields need nice trails.”

“We need a handicapped accessible food cupboard.”

“It would be great to have walking/biking trails that are pet and

 kid-friendly and taken care of for us.”

“I think it would be nice in Madison if people had access to a walking path and bike riding path that is not for vehicles.”

 

Outdoor Spaces/Buildings

Related Services

Very Important

Already exists

Recreation, wellness, and fitness for older folks

69%

3%

Crosswalks with audio/visual signs

67%

6%

Well-lit safe intersections for walkers, bikers, and drivers

66%

8%

Well-maintained, accessible public restrooms

65%

3%

Separate pathways for bicyclists and pedestrians

57%

0%

Walkable streets with sidewalks in good condition

52%

16%

Well-maintained public buildings that are easy to get into 

51%

14%

A community policing or neighborhood watch program

51%

11%

 

 

Domain-Specific Strategy Chart/Action Plan

 

  • Goal Setting and Activity Planning

Goal: To maximize the use and safety of Madison’s outdoor spaces and buildings

 

 

Activity 1

Progress

Outcome

 

Activity 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Establish Signage for Trails

Completed

Somerset Woods Trustees Purchased the Weston Woods and Waters Trail and has promoted it by placing appropriate signage.

https://www.mainetrailfinder.com/trails/trail/weston-woods-and-waters

Activity 1-2

Complete

Create Trail Specific Programming

Somerset Community Television (Channel 11)

December 2020

In the Living Well Series Videos, one of the items spoke about is recreational trails. With the assistance of SCTV 11, footage and photos of the trails will be broadcasted with the Living Well Videos.

 

Activity 1

Progress

Outcome

 

Activity 2-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Create Needs Assessment with Costs for improve-ments

Expand to town office and town library

On-Going

Voting had to change locations in Madison because the town office did not have enough space to function smoothly during elections and has been moved to the Old Point School

Activity 2-2

 

 

 

 

Renovate the Old Point School into an accessible place to vote.

On-going

The Old Point School has been renovated into a new voting space due to the lack of space at the Town Office. There is a 19 ft ramp, a new bathroom, ADA adjustments, and the parking lot and sidewalks were repaved,

 

 

 

 

Civic Participation and Employment:

Civic engagement in Madison will become more intergenerational as younger residents are recruited to join boards and committees.  Economic Development is expected to create between 100 and 150 new jobs in the community over the next few years, providing employment opportunities for all ages.

  • Assessment: Current Strengths and Areas for Improvement in Civic Engagement and Employment

Assessment of current strengths

We have a number of opportunities for seniors to be involved in the community and contribute their knowledge and experience (e.g., part-time clerks in the town office, boards and committee work, part-time employment in the library or Taylor’s Drug Store, volunteers in the food pantry, youth groups and schools, Redington-Fairview Hospital and non-profit or civic groups like the Historical Society and hospice);  we have A4TD senior employment services. 

Possible immediate/short-term activities

Encourage part-time work at the two day care facilities in town; encourage volunteerism for the health of it (e.g., poll worker or hospice positions, drivers, connections with schools through the 100-mile club, walking school bus, or crossing guards, service as in-home care senior companions); look for places that can serve as social gathering points/hang-outs for seniors (e.g., VFW); develop a website where seniors can identify opportunities to volunteer or work for wages; offer  job fairs for seniors.   

  • What did we learn from community surveys?

 

Civic Participation/Employment

Related Services

Very Important

Already exists

 

Job training for people who want to learn new skills

55%

2%

 

Opportunities to learn new technology (phone, internet)

53%

2%

 

 

 

Domain-Specific Strategy Chart/Action Plan

  • Goal Setting and Activity Planning

Goal: To recruit volunteers/ workers to serve 

 

Activity 1

Progress

Outcome

 

Activity 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan for Day of Service

On-Going

 

Respect and Social Inclusion Domain

(includes Social Participation):

 Social Isolation remains an issue in central Maine with an aging population and cold climate.  In addition to adverse weather, the climate of unfriendliness to outsiders can further isolate residents of all ages.  In the next few years Madison will have to re-invent itself and its approach to reaching out across generational and geographical boundaries.

 

  • Assessment: Current Strengths and Areas for Improvement in Respect and Social Inclusion

Assessment of current strengths

We have many opportunities for seniors to participate socially in the community (e.g., high school sporting events, school plays and concerts, the Madison-Anson senior luncheons at VFW, civic and community organizations, communities of faith, knitters’ group, cribbage at the American Legion and bingo at VFW, Bone Builders, sewing groups, basketball and softball games); we also have Senior Spectrum and Channel 11.

Possible immediate/short-term activities

Encourage senior participation in community service days; develop/expand opportunities for socializing/education (e.g., more school functions like Thanksgiving dinner, walking groups, reading at the school library, library programs, canning classes, developing places where seniors can meet regularly); recruit young people to help provide assistance to seniors and reach out to the home-bound (e.g., helping with yard work); offer a regular senior newsletter and other ways to communicate with folks; develop a ride share program to help provide transportation to activities; maintain a list of people who are willing to help seniors; bring youth and seniors together more frequently at various events; advertise school offerings (e.g., walking opportunities, weight room) more prominently to seniors.          

Possible long-term activities

Expand adult/senior education opportunities for seniors to learn a skill or socialize (e.g., yoga, meditation, scrapbooking); Aradvocate role).

 

  • What did we learn from community surveys?

Survey Respondents said…

“A group does welcome new residents to town, but it never happened for us when we moved here.  I still feel like an outsider.” “We have forgotten about our seniors and handicapped adults.” 

 

 

Selected survey findings

·         Social isolation appears to be a problem for some of the sample. When asked how often they see family, friends, or neighbors in the community, 61% said several times a week, 20% reported occasionally, 12% indicated once every few weeks, and 8% said rarely.

·         By far the most common source of lifelong learning opportunities (for 56% of the sample) is the library.

·         44% of the sample said that they feel included and respected as a resident of Madison; another 36% said they feel this way most of the time.

Respect and Social Inclusion

Related Services

Very Important

Already exists

Stores and activities that offer senior discounts

62%

8%

Community activities and events that are accessible and welcoming to people of all ages

61%

3%

Affordable activities and community events

60%

8%

Domain-Specific Strategy Chart/Action Plan

         

  • Goal setting and Activity Planning

Goal: To better social inclusion for all ages that may have worsened due to COVID-19

 

Activity 1

Progress

Outcome

 

Activity 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Establish Intergenerational Opportunities after COVID-19

On-Going

 

 

Activity 1.2

In

Progress

Establish an online art class. For older adults to join by zoom

On-Going

 

For more information on the senior survey and current activities of the Madison Age-Friendly Committee, see the Town of Madison Web site - https://madisonmaine.com/ and click on Quick Links in the right hand corner for the Age Friendly Community link.

To volunteer and help the activities for aging adults, contact Madison Town Manager Tim Curtis at 696-3971.

Report Designed with assistance from Somerset Public Health and Ken Town, Evaluation Consultant

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